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Final Surge Podcast

In the Final Surge Podcast, we interview coaches, athletes authors, and endurance industry experts to help you train with a purpose.
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Now displaying: February, 2017
Feb 22, 2017

Welcome to episode 34 of the Final Surge Podcast with our guest Jason Hartmann. Jason was a very successful professional runner who in the last few years Jason hung up his racing flats and traded them in for a coaching whistle. Jason is quickly building a very successful program at Saginaw Valley State and we talk to him about that process. 

How did you get your start in running?

At what point would you advise a kid to start running full-time in high school based on your running history?

You ran at Oregon, what lead to the decision to go there?

When you were running at Oregon at what point did you think it may be something you wanted to pursue after college?

You had a very successful running area including a couple 4th place finishes at Boston and a top American at Chicago, what was the most memorable race for you?

You retired from running in 2014 and decided to get into coaching, what made you want to get involved in coaching?

You mentioned you coached Elise Cranny, was that your first time coaching?

With many high school kids, we see them peak or burn out after high school. What is it with Elise that has lead to her success in college too?

You are now coaching at Saginaw Valley State. How did that come about?

What was the program like when you took over vs. now?

What type of athletes are you looking for to be part of the program?

What is something your program does that you think all successful college programs do

What is something that you think you guys do that may be unique or different?

When coaching everyone has to find their own formula, their own voice, but we get influences from other coaches. Who has been a big influence in your coaching career and philosophy?

If you could change something about our high school programs, what would it be?

Is that your biggest challenge making it fun and getting the kids to be consistent?

You are making the transition from xc to track how do the workouts change from cross to a 1500 on the track?

So is the biggest change race paced workouts?

How are you using Final Surge in your coaching?

Are you laying out the week before hand for them? Or how are you putting the workouts in?

Are they required to log in and give you notes on how they feel or what do you expect from them?

Are you still doing some running on your own?

What does the future hold, where do you see yourself in 10 years from now?

Rapid Fire... 5 questions in under 1 minute
Favorite running book? - Jack Daniels
Current trainers you are wearing? - Vomero’s
Favorite race? - Minnesota Twin Cities Marathon
Favorite recovery meal or recovery drink? - Pizza and Coke
Your favorite workout - Hill Runs

Connect with Jason on Twitter
Connect with Final Surge on Twitter

Feb 15, 2017

Welcome to Episode 33 of the Final Surge podcast where we talk to Scott Simmons who is the coach of the American Distance Project in Colorado Springs. Scott has been coaching for 27-years and recently had his men go 1-2-3-4 at the US XC Championships. We talk about his program’s success, training for a marathon and why he thinks the US is not where it should be yet in the marathon. We have been making some changes to the final surge software recently. If you have any ideas or have any questions please follow us at Facebook.com/FinalSurge or on Twitter @FinalSurge

How did you get started in running?

How did you make the transition to coaching?

You have been coaching for 27-years, who have been your biggest coaching influences?

The American Distance Project has been making a lot of noise recently. When did you start the group?

How are you growing the team, what types of athletes are a good fit and how do you identify them?

I have read you are not as much of a believer in traditional periodization as many coaches and likely to always be working on every aspect of running. Can you explain your coaching philosophy?

You have runners from 1500 to 10k to marathon. We know the marathon is it’s own beast, but how do you train an athlete differently if their focus is the 1500 vs the 10k?

Speed is much difference than endurance, an example if you take a 400-meter runner in high school they could work on dropping 1-2 a season off their 400 time while a 1500/1600 guy could drop 10-12 seconds. So obviously there is more bang for your buck on the aerobic side. Let’s give some practical advice to a runner who may be listening out there. If some age group weekend 20 minute 5k runner out there is looking to make a change and get some improvement what are some of the things you would tell them to look at?

Do you use HIIT as part of your training program?

Let’s switch to the marathon. One of the big differences between a marathon and a 10k besides the mileage, which is obvious, is fueling. Do you work on fat burning adaptation as part of your program and if so how?

What are you doing for workouts to target fat as a fuel?

If you have a new kid out of college who won’t likely race over a 10k in the next few years, will you use this training at all or is it just for your marathon runners?

Is the 1/2 marathon closer to the marathon or 10k for you as far as fat burning?

The USATF XC was this past week and the top four men to cross the finish line were all coached by you. You are obviously doing something right. What are some of the things you are doing that you think every great program does?

Knowing you have four athletes heading to Uganda for the World’s, and the weather will likely be a lot warmer, what are you doing to prepare your athletes for the climate change?

What do you do, that you think may be different than other programs?

You coached at the college and the professional level. So when you were a college coach and got in a group of incoming freshmen what did you see were the places that the high school students were lacking?

In America, we have had success in the last few years on the track, but we are not having the same results in the marathon. Where do you see us going for American marathon runners?

What do you think of the 2-hour marathon program? Do you think it is attainable anytime soon?

Rapid Fire... 5 questions in under 1 minute
Favorite running book? - Once a Runner
Current trainers you are wearing? - Nike Vomero
Favorite race? - College Reunion Race
Favorite recovery meal or recovery drink? - Pepperoni Pizza and IPA
Your favorite workout - 25x400 with short rest

Resources:
Our interview with Joe Vigil
Simmons Twitter Account
Facebook Page of ADP
Dhama Core Cooling

Feb 8, 2017

Welcome to Episode 32 of the Final Surge Podcast where today we talk to 2016 USATF Mountain Ultra Trail Woman's open runner of the year Addie Bracy. Addie, a former Olympic Trials track athlete made the switch to mountain racing in 2016 and won the US Championship in her first race. We talk about the transition to mountain and trail running and we also talk about her getting involved as a high school coach. I hope you enjoy this show and make sure you check out what the Hudson team is doing with coaching to support their athletes.

Addie welcome, we like to start out getting to know our guest a little better so if you could tell me how you got your start in running?

What was your high school running career like?

You walked on at UNC, how was it walking on and what can you share with our listeners about that experience?

You had a very respectful 16:20 in the 5k in college, that may not have been good enough to win a national championship, but many of our listeners, male and female would take it. After running at North Carolina, what was your thought process about what next?

Many, including myself, consider Brad Hudson to be one of the top US Distance coaches of our time. He was a guest of ours in episode 2 of this podcast last summer. How did you get connected with Brad and Hudson Elite?

So in North Carolina were you running on your own and not with a team?

How hard was it running on your own vs running with a group like you do now?

You recently made the jump into running up mountains for fun, what were you thinking?

So that was your first mountain race?

As you mentioned the selection for the US Team was held at Loon Mountain in New Hampshire this past summer and you won the US Title on the Women’s side. I grew up in NH and have skied down Loon Mountain several times. But the only way I have even thought about going up is on the lift. When you lined up for that race what were your expectations?

Then you got to represent the US in the World Mountain Running Championships, how was that feeling of representing your country?

Are you going to continue to do mountain running competitively?

What were the biggest changes you made in your training?

What is a typical length and what is the elevation gain of a mountain race?

Can you break down the training a little bit for us on a week what it looks like for you now?

So it sounds like the biggest difference is your hard days instead of tempo work on the track is more of just trail work?

Is a hard day still speed week or is to more climbing now for the hard day?

Not only did you podium at the 2016 World Mountain Running Champs as a team, you also made the podium at the 2016 Eliptigo World Championships. How much time do you spend on an Eliptigo?

You have run at the Olympic trials and other prestigious races in your career. What has been the highlight of your running career so far?

You made the jump to high school coaching this past year. What made you want to get involved with coaching?

You mentioned you didn’t know how serious they would be, every high school teams has a variety of

Welcome to Episode 32 of the Final Surge Podcast where today we talk to 2016 USATF Mountain Ultra Trail Woman's open runner of the year Addie Bracy. Addie, a former Olympic Trials track athlete made the switch to mountain racing in 2016 and won the US Championship in her first race. We talk about the transition to mountain and trail running and we also talk about her getting involved as a high school coach. I hope you enjoy this show and make sure you check out what the Hudson team is doing with coaching to support their athletes. Now on to the show.

Addie welcome, we like to start out getting to know our guest a little better so if you could tell me how you got your start in running?

What was your high school running career like?

You walked on at UNC, how was it walking on and what can you share with our listeners about that experience?

You had a very respectful 16:20 in the 5k in college, that may not have been good enough to win a national championship, but many of our listeners, male and female would take it. After running at North Carolina, what was your thought process about what next?

Many, including myself, consider Brad Hudson to be one of the top US Distance coaches of our time. He was a guest of ours in episode 2 of this podcast last summer. How did you get connected with Brad and Hudson Elite?

So in North Carolina were you running on your own and not with a team?

How hard was it running on your own vs running with a group like you do now?

You recently made the jump into running up mountains for fun, what were you thinking?

So that was your first mountain race?

As you mentioned the selection for the US Team was held at Loon Mountain in New Hampshire this past summer and you won the US Title on the Women’s side. I grew up in NH and have skied down Loon Mountain several times. But the only way I have even thought about going up is on the lift. When you lined up for that race what were your expectations?

Then you got to represent the US in the World Mountain Running Championships, how was that feeling of representing your country?

Are you going to continue to do mountain running competitively?

What were the biggest changes you made in your training?

What is a typical length and what is the elevation gain of a mountain race?

Can you break down the training a little bit for us on a week what it looks like for you now?

So it sounds like the biggest difference is your hard days instead of tempo work on the track is more of just trail work?

Is a hard day still speed week or is to more climbing now for the hard day?

Not only did you podium at the 2016 World Mountain Running Champs as a team, you also made the podium at the 2016 Eliptigo World Championships. How much time do you spend on an Eliptigo?

You have run at the Olympic trials and other prestigious races in your career. What has been the highlight of your running career so far?

You made the jump to high school coaching this past year. What made you want to get involved with coaching?

You mentioned you didn’t know how serious they would be, every high school teams has a variety of runners. How do you deal with the differences in motivation levels?

A large section of our listeners are high school coaches. What advice do you have for coaches, something they may not be thinking of when working with high school kids?

What advice do you give to your kids who want to continue competitive running after high school?

When we talked to Brad last year he mentioned the athletes at Hudson Elite did some coaching, are you involved in that?

Do you take runners of any ability?

And a Twitter question we had come in, you can follow us on Twitter @FinalSurge

There are a lot of busy coaches out there. How do you juggle coaching, training, work and a personal life?

What is next for you, any races on the schedule?

Rapid Fire... 5 questions in under 1 minute

Favorite running book? - Hudson’s Little Black Book
Current trainers you are wearing? - Salomon S-lab Sonic
Favorite race? - 10k
Favorite recovery meal or recovery drink? - Bacon
Your favorite workout - 400 repeats

Resources
Addie on Twitter
Addie on Instagram
Addie's blog
Hudson Training
Little Black Book of workouts

 

Feb 1, 2017

Drew Hunter -

In episode 31 of the Final Surge podcast we welcome professional runner Drew Hunter. Many consider Drew the best American high school runner since Alan Webb. Drew turned down the opportunity to run at Oregon and instead signed a deal with Adidas to turn pro. We talk to Drew about what went into that decision-making process, how the new lifestyle is treating him and we break down a week of workouts. The first couple of questions there was a few audio issues with his phone, but it cleared up. I hope you enjoy this episode as much as I enjoyed doing it.

So let’s start at the beginning, when did you get your start running?

Before that mile in 8th grade had you ever run before or was that really your first time?

How fast was your mile in 8th grade?

When was it that it struck you, hey I may be pretty good at this and have a future.

We talked to your coach Tom Schwartz in Episode 12 about you going pro. You had said you were going to head off to Oregon, but then you decided to take another direction, can you tell us what went into that decision making process?

So what are your plans for college?

You had ended your high school career with Lyme disease, you feel most of the way back or are you fully recovered from that now?

You signed with Adidas, but not really a team One of the tough parts about going pro right away is you lose that team aspect. How has that change been for you?

Your coach is across the country and you have no team, have you found any running buddies?

So how has your training changed since you turned pro?

Everyone who ran in high school knows the drill. You are in school all day, then you get in your running and strength work, you spend a couple hours on homework and by the time you realize it, it is time for bed and to get started all over again. Now, your job is a runner. So what does a day look like now that this is your job?

What's been the biggest challenge on or off the track for your transition to a pro?

Made your debut Sir Walter Mile last August, what was it like lining up on the line as a pro runner for the first time and not against high school kids your age did it feel different?

How is it working with Adidas knowing they are paying you, but at the same time knowing you are younger and not quite there yet. Do you feel any pressure?

This weekend you ran another sub 4-minute mile at The Armory to win the Men’s 1 Mile Elite race during the New Balance Games. Is this where you see your career focusing on in the next few years the 1500/mile?

Let's talk about that training. Listeners love to hear training talk. Can you walk us through some training, the types of workouts you do, paces you run them in and such?

How are you communicating with Tom on these workouts?

What is your next race you have on the calendar?

What is the plan for outdoor season?

Did you set any goals for this year?

Where do you see yourself in 5yrs?

I know your mom is a high school track coach. If she incited So what advice do you have for young high school runners who may be just getting started in the sport of track?

Rapid Fire... 5 questions in under 1 minute
Favorite running book? - Born To Run
Current trainers you are wearing? - Adidas Supernova Glide
Favorite race? - Mile
Favorite recovery meal or recovery drink? - Chocolate Protein Drink
Your favorite workout - Hill Repeats

And because Francis Garcia was so passionate about asking questions on Twitter, we have a few bonus questions for you:
If you could remove one sport from the Olympics what gets cut.
Taco Bell or Del Taco

Drew on Twitter
Drew on Instagram

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